Earlier this month, both houses of Congress passed the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (“2021 NDAA”).  Included in Title LXIV of the 2021 NDAA (Title 64 for those of us rusty on Roman numerals), are new information reporting requirements intended to identify individual beneficial owners of certain business entities.  Subject to a number of exceptions, the bill requires certain U.S. and foreign entities to file annual reports with the U.S. Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) that will disclose information regarding the beneficial owners of reporting companies.  Overall, the reporting will identify those individuals exercising “control,” as the term is defined, over those entities required to report.  According to the legislation, over two million corporations, LLCs, and similar entities are formed under state law in the United States each year, and many “malign actors seek to conceal their ownership” of various entities intended to facilitate illegal activity.  Accordingly, the reporting mandated by the legislation is intended to help protect national security interests and interstate and foreign commerce, as well as counter the financing of terrorism.

The legislation passed both chambers by overwhelming majorities − 335-78 in the House and 84-13 in the Senate. Notwithstanding the significant Congressional support, President Trump has not yet signed the bill into law and has suggested that he may veto the bill (H.R. 6395).  The legislation will become law tomorrow (December 24, 2020) if the President does not veto the bill.  Even if the President vetoes the bill, it appears likely that Congress will override it by reconvening after Christmas and before the new year.  H.Res. 1271 (the rule providing for the consideration of the Senate amendment to H.R. 133 (the end-of-year package that includes COVID relief)) provided that if a veto message is laid before the House on the 2021 NDAA, the veto message and the bill shall be postponed until the legislative day of Monday, December 28, 2020.  Accordingly, if Trump vetoes the bill, the House will vote on its override on December 28.

UPDATE:  President Trump vetoed the bill on December 23, 2020.

UPDATE:  The House of Representatives voted to override President Trump’s veto on December 28, 2020.  Additional coverage is available here.  

UPDATE:  The Senate voted to override President Trump’s veto on January 1, 2021.  Additional coverage is available here.


Continue Reading New Information Reporting on Beneficial Owners Included in 2021 NDAA

Earlier this month, the IRS announced in interim guidance that it would amend Section 20.1.7 of the Internal Revenue Manual to provide a methodology for the calculation of intentional disregard penalties under Section 6721 for filers who fail to file information returns electronically when required.  In general, filers of more than 250 information returns are required to file such returns electronically with the IRS.  For this purpose, each type of information return is considered separately, so that a filer who files 200 Forms 1099-DIV and 200 Forms 1042-S is not required to file electronically.  In contrast, if the filer was required to file 300 Forms 1099-DIV and 200 Forms 1042-S, it must file the Forms 1099-DIV electronically, but may file Forms 1042-S on paper.

Section 6721 imposes a penalty of $250 for failures that are not due to intentional disregard.  Section 6721(e) provides an increased penalty for cases of intentional disregard.  In general, the increased penalty is equal to $500 or, if greater, a percentage of the aggregate amount of the items required to be reported correctly on the returns.  Information returns required under Section 6045(a) (Form 1099-B and Form 1099-MISC, Box 14), Section 6050K (Form 8308), and Section 6050L (returns by donees relating to dispositions of donated property within two years of the donor’s contribution of such property) are subject to a penalty of 5% of the amount required to be reported.  Returns required to be filed under Section 6041A(b) (Form 1099-MISC, Box 9), Section 6050H (Form 1098), and Section 6050J (Form 1099-A) are subject only to the flat $500 per return penalty.  Information returns required under other sections are subject to a penalty of 10% of the amount required to be reported.  (Different penalties apply for failures to file correct Forms 8300, but such forms are not subject to the mandatory electronic filing requirements of Section 6011.)
Continue Reading IRS Provides Guidance on Calculating Intentional Disregard Penalties for Paper Filings